In detail

Aspirin is good for women's heart health

Aspirin is good for women's heart health


Healthy women who take a low or moderate amount of aspirin may benefit from an extended life span and are at a lower risk of heart disease, reports bbc.co.uk. The study of the effects of aspirin was conducted by a team of American researchers who monitored 80,000 women taking aspirin for more than 20 years. Scientists have published the findings in the "Archives of Internal Medicine" and say that good health can be due to low doses of aspirin. Instead, British experts warn of aspirin treatment, which could cause bleeding. Researchers at Massachusetts General Hospital, along with colleagues at Harvard Medical School in Boston, have monitored a number of women between the ages of 35 and 60. Their monitoring began in 1980 and continued from 2 to 2 years, until 2004.
At the beginning of the study, none of the women suffered from cardiovascular disease or cancer. At each assessment, women were asked if they were constantly using aspirin and how many tablets they were using in one week. During the study, fewer than 30,000 women took a low or moderate dose of aspirin, while 5,000 took more than 14 tablets a week. As of June 1, 2004, 9,477 were no longer alive. 2000 died from heart disease and 4,469 from cancer.
Risk factors
The risk of death for women who reported low to moderate aspirin consumption was 25% lower than for women who did not use aspirin regularly. People taking aspirin were 38% lower at risk of cardiovascular disease, and the risk of dying from cancer was reduced by 12%. However, it has been observed that a higher dose of aspirin does not improve health. A team of researchers led by Dr. Andrew Chan reported in the Archives of Internal Medicine that the use of asprine over a period of 1 to 5 years may be associated with a significant reduction in mortality caused by cardiovascular disease. Instead, to reduce the risk of cancer mortality, aspirin should be used for at least 10 years.
Aspirin intake enhances its benefits for older people and those at risk of heart disease. The team notes that aspirin can help reduce inflammation and damage cells due to oxidation. They also indicate that the study was conducted with women participants who independently chose how to take the aspirin and not clinical trials, and the results do not indicate that all women should take aspirin. The researchers also said that more research is needed on the effects of aspirin.
On the other hand, Dr. John Baron, of "Dartmouth Medical School" in New Hampshire, said that in the "Women's Health Study", 40,000 women were monitored for 11 years and no benefit was found. aspirin. One wonders if aspirin is really good, or are there other explanations regarding the differences between the results of the two studies. Professor Peter Weissberg, director of the British Heart Foundation, said: "The study by Massachusetts researchers is not so conclusive and cannot be considered as evidence that aspirin can prevent heart disease; there is sufficient evidence to show that people who have had a heart attack or are at such a risk may be treated with aspirin; In any case, aspirin is not good for everyone who wants to remove the risk of developing heart disease, because this medicine can also lead to bleeding. " "It will, however, remain a controversial topic, and we cannot give a definitive answer on it."
March 30, 2007