In detail

Acute febrile illness

Acute febrile illness

Question:

- My baby, one month old and 20 days old, coughs very badly. He has to get the vaccine, but because he coughs he will have to postpone it. Is it okay to give him an antibiotic, given that he only has one month and 20 days? And if I give her an antibiotic will I be able to get her the vaccine then?

Answer:

Acute febrile illnesses are temporary contraindications for vaccination. This is because vaccines are made from germs or even killed (bacteria, viruses) germs or live attenuated, which once introduced into the body will stimulate the person's immune system to produce antibodies against those germs.

Acute febrile illnesses are temporary contraindications for vaccination. This is because vaccines are made from germs or even killed (bacteria, viruses) germs or live attenuated, which once introduced into the body will stimulate the person's immune system to produce antibodies against those germs.
During an acute infection, however, the immune system may no longer function effectively, which makes vaccination ineffective, and there may even be a risk of adverse effects.
Therefore, if the child has an acute infection, vaccination should be postponed until healthy.
Antibiotics are drug preparations that act only on bacteria; they have no effect on viruses and therefore are not indicated in uncomplicated rhinopharyngitis (cold: which is usually of viral etiology).


On the other hand, irrespective of age (including adults) antibiotics should be given only at the doctor's recommendation.
Also, the administration of antibiotics is not related to the vaccination indication or contraindication.
Alina Pop-Began
- Resident doctor - Anesthesia and Intensive Care-
  • Specialist details